Law school 'imposters' need allies not accomplices

Law school ‘imposters’ need allies not accomplices

Do a quick search of 'impostor syndrome'. What did you find? What about 'impostor syndrome in law school'? That produces some worrying results. There is a mountain of advice about how self-professed 'imposters' - law students, lawyers and academics - can heal themselves. A lot of it is good advice about talking to other people. …

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Reflective practice

The 5 steps of reflective practice as a professional skill in law school

Reflective thinking is a professional skill. While the law school curriculum emphasises the development of reflective thinking, there is very little guidance on teaching it. When we think about 'reflection', we have a tendency to define it as remembering something - an event, something someone did, or even something we did. That's important. But that's …

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‘Mistakes’ teach law students real-world skills responding to ambiguity

Typos, misspelling, wrong names and inconsistent dates in law school problem questions - they are usually a source of huge embarrassment for law teachers. But they are much closer to the way lawyers often get client instructions. 'Mistakes’ can teach law students real-world skills responding to ambiguity. Clients rarely arrive in lawyers’ offices with neatly …

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Some practical steps to teaching case note research in law school

Writing case notes is a common form of assessment in law school, especially with first-year law students, as a way of exposing them to basic legal research, writing and thinking skills before moving on to substantive subjects.  More importantly, the preparation of a case note is usually the first taste first-year law students have of …

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Promoting a growth mindset in law students by dropping the feedback sandwich for meaningful assessment feedback.

Improving law school feedback: Dropping the sandwich

Over the last few weeks, some fascinating articles about feedback for law students have appeared in my inbox. But they seemed to be inconsistent. Should we drop the feedback sandwich? The first was this short but engaging post from February on the ‘feedback sandwich’ by Carrie Sperling over on the Best Practices for Legal Education …

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